Posts Tagged ‘undergraduate education’

March Madness: Ignorance Isn’t Bliss

Sunday, April 3rd, 2011

“You’re anal,” concluded a student in one of my writing classes after I told her I wasn’t accepting her late class assignment. It’s clear in the class guidelines that first drafts of story assignments must be turned in on time or the grade for the assignment is F. But she seemed to believe, for reasons I didn’t understand, that I would overlook her serious omission. Well, said a student in another news writing class, we feel that the class is disorganized. We show up we and we never know what to expect.

These were the most notable comments in the face-to-face meetings I scheduled with my student writers in March. This semester, like the others, many didn’t read the syllabus nor the assignment guidelines and many came to class unprepared. Some can’t or won’t follow simple directions.

They, like many before them, Do the DUH a lot.

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MEDP 299.47 Pushback, Fall, 2009 – Part V

Friday, February 5th, 2010

RB: Requires a separate page. Gets one in Part VI.

LM: Blindsided by personal, family issues. INC.

End Part V

PUSHBACK, MEDP 299.47, Fall, 2009 – Part III

Friday, February 5th, 2010

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PUSHBACK, MEDP 299.47, Fall, 2009 – Part II

Friday, February 5th, 2010

Pushback can range from physical threats & menacing behavior to moderate passive aggressive behavior (such as, I dare you to make me do the assignments) to the negligible. Extreme, never to be tolerated; moderate, up to a certain level until it threatens to fuel rebellious anticipation of 30-40Ps; negligible, hardly worth mentioning (a little slack shouldn’t hurt but don’t tell that to 30-40Ps and the Colleagues who support them).

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PUSHBACK, MEDP 299.47, Fall, 2009 – Part I

Friday, February 5th, 2010

AKA Feature Writing

In many ways, this was a typical D:F/M advanced news writing class. The students were talented, all could write. Yet … !

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PUSHBACK – Resistance Is Futile But Anticipated

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010

This is an introduction of sorts to a six-part series. A few years ago, I invited the New York Time’s first Ombudsman to my journalism ethics/responsibility class. That position, now occupied by Clark Hoyt, is primarily known now as the New York Times Public Editor. I’m speculating that the presence of a Public Editor is more preferable to Ombudsman which sounds akin to a lawman enforcing the law in a lawless community (at least, that’s how I imagine the NYT natives perceive the position when it was announced in the wake of the Jason Blair scandal and other journalistic ignominies which didn’t get as much attention but contributed to marring the public image of the Times).

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