Hunter College Alumnus, Former WORD Senior Editor and Internationally Known Journalist Announces the Upcoming Release of His Memoir

September 10th, 2018

What It Is and What It Is Not – A Reminder

August 26th, 2018

Implicit Bias Training for Police

August 18th, 2018



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Weekly Digest for Minding the Workplace, August 13, 2019

August 13th, 2018

By Professor David Yamada

In countless discussions about workplace bullying, mobbing, and abuse, we often speculate on whether the chief aggressors may have narcissistic, psychopathic, or sociopathic tendencies.

Check out interview of Dr. Ramani Durvasula: “Narcissist, Psychopath, or Sociopath: How to Spot the Differences”

August 2nd, 2018

WBI 2017 U.S. Workplace Bullying Survey

• 19% of Americans are bullied, another 19% witness it
• 61% of Americans are aware of abusive conduct in the workplace
• 60.4 million Americans are affected by it
• 70% of perpetrators are men; 60% of targets are women
• Hispanics are the most frequently bullied race
• 61% of bullies are bosses, the majority (63%) operate alone
• 40% of bullied targets are believed to suffer adverse health effects
• 29% of targets remain silent about their experiences
• 71% of employer reactions are harmful to targets
• 60% of coworker reactions are harmful to targets
• To stop it, 65% of targets lose their original jobs
• 77% of Americans support enacting a new law
• 46% report worsening of work relationships, post-Trump election

July 30th, 2018

Workplace Bullying Affects Nearly Half of US Workers. It’s Time We Did Something About It

For Whom the Gods Drive Crazy …

July 17th, 2018

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July 14th, 2018

What Do Colleagues Think About Arbitration in January, 2019?

July 12th, 2018

A surreal faculty meeting that Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí would appreciate.

Minding the Workplace: Ruminating, Problem Solving, and Coping in the Midst of Work Abuse

June 29th, 2018

By David Yamada

In an article recently published in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology( abstract here), researchers Abbas Firoozabadi, Sjir Uitdewilligen, and Fred R. H. Zijlstra pose their key question in the title: “Should you switch off or stay engaged? The consequences of thinking about work on the trajectory of psychological well-being over time.”

Basically, they wanted to explore how taking our jobs home with us affects psychological well-being, especially when it comes to how we deal with work-related problems. Their focus was the distinction between ruminating (in this context, repeatedly thinking about the negative emotional aspects of a work experience) vs. problem-solving (analyzing potential responses and solutions). As some readers can already see, this study has significant implications for those experiencing forms of bullying, mobbing, and harassment at work.

Click here for full article.